the Christian Enigma

11.0 Introduction

Primitive societies and societies that believe themselves threatened accept the concentration of power in one single fist. Authority is naturally conceived as a whole, which would fall into pieces if subject to differentiation. A power that is split is supposed … Continue reading

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11.1 The Resurrection of Jesus

The most enigmatic event in the history of mankind is the rise of the Christian civilization. The Buddha was a prince. He had been educated in a palace and was of superior intelligence. He was credited with mastery in the … Continue reading

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11.2 The Establishment of the Christian Faith

Paul, a Roman citizen endowed with the most vigorous personality, converted to the Christian faith in a flash of conscience that characterizes this type of man (e.g. Charles de Foucauld, Francis of Assisi, Hubert) 1. Paul liquidated the “by God … Continue reading

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11.3 Christianisation of Europe

11.3.1 Monachism The barbarians who invaded Gaul, Brittany, Germany were accustomed to only light agricultural work at a primitive level and were endowed with the characteristic inconstancy and wandering urge of primitives. For them, as for nomads, only the present … Continue reading

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11.4 Christendom

The moral fiber of the Roman Empire had been lost well before the barbaric invasions, and able manpower did not match any more the needs of the Government. There was a definite lack of it at the higher echelons. Able … Continue reading

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12.0 Introduction

All great civilizations and many lesser societies developed sophisticated understandings of the natural world. Diverse and complex systems of knowledge arose and functioned in varied social contexts. In the name of multicultural awareness, a politically correct Worldcentric caricature holds the … Continue reading

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12.1 A Genuine Culture

Once Gregory (monk Hildebrand) reformed the Church, the clergy was placed in authority not by the suffrages of the people but certainly more by their talents than by the influence of relatives. As advocated by Plato in the “Republic”, the … Continue reading

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12.2 The Confusion Of The Medieval Mind

The World of the middle Ages is as alien to us as are all other primitive civilizations. The language in use was Latin but not everybody mastered it. The vernaculars were rough and imprecise. Dictionaries were absent. Grammar, syntax and … Continue reading

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12.3 Scholasticism

For the medieval intellectual, thinking is a profession whose tools were fixed by Aristotle, who wrote the Organon in Greek, which Boece (480-524) translated in Latin (Organum). The Organum was a manual of Logic describing a method of correct thinking … Continue reading

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12.4 The Paradigmatic Deviations

12.4.1 Prelogical Reasoning The man of the middle Ages was Christian. It was from the dogma as starting point that he tried to understand the world. The Roman version of the dogma was a stable entity with fortunately many points … Continue reading

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