17. The French Cultural exception

17.0 Introduction

The French culture is a culture similar to the cultures practiced by the vast majority of the non-Christian nations throughout the world since time immemorial. It became a cultural exception in Europe only during this last century, when it was … Continue reading

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17.1 The French Revolution

In France, the historical tradition makes of the French Revolution (1789) the mother of the republican project. The existence, before the Revolution, of European republics (Venice, Geneva, the Low Countries and Corsica) and New World republics (Iceland, the US) is … Continue reading

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17.2 Collective Schizoidy

Charles the fifth remarked “no nation has done so much for its ruin than the French one; but all helps it” 2. Jean le Bon, prisoner of Edward III in 1356, was released on promises his son did not keep. … Continue reading

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17.3 Contingency

Contingency is the surest way to inhibit initiative. Economic development is based on individual intelligence and private property. Despotic civilizations, viscerally incapable to conceive the concept of economic development, have no use of private property. Already during the Middle Ages, … Continue reading

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17.4 Archaic Administration and Deductive Logic

Unique among modern states, revolutionary France reverted to an archaic administrative model similar to that practiced by the Chinese Old High Culture. Several schools were founded, whose vocation it was to educate the civil servant. These schools are still functioning. … Continue reading

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17.5 Anti-semitism and Chauvinism

The repulsive extermination of the European Jews between 1933 and 1945 and the ensuing vigorous propaganda of the Jewish communities systematically presenting themselves thereafter as the sole and perpetual victims entitled by right to endless reparations and by right also … Continue reading

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17.6 Xenophobia

The foreign and domestic policies conducted by France during centuries had fostered distrust for foreigners, and the hatred of these for France. Vauban, in a letter to Racine written on 13 September 1696 stated: “What reputation will we have by … Continue reading

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17.7 Contemporary France

About 170 years ago, the French novelist Balzac remarked (Le père Goriot,(Father Goriot) 1834): “If the proud aristocracies of all the European capitals refuse to admit in their ranks an infamous millionaire, Paris extends its arms, runs to his feasts, … Continue reading

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